To quote Colin Lawler: “Starting with the last question – smartphones have improved both in terms of processing capability and speaker and microphone quality. When combining this with a revolutionary.and patented, new approach to sonar, we found a way to enable a pretty clear picture of the respiratory pattern and   Read More ...

  Rajalakshmi Nandakumar and Vint Cerf

Check out out UIST work on wireless analytics for 3D printed objects https://www.technologyreview.com/the-download/612255/3d-printed-plastic-objects-can-track-their-own-use-without-any-electronics/ http://printedanalytics.cs.washington.edu/wireless-analytics-3d.pdf

5 apps and services for productivity and wellness    

    https://www.geekwire.com/2018/rajalakshmi-nandakumar/

Rajalakshmi Nandakumar has been recognized with a Paul Baran Young Scholar Award from the Marconi Society for her work on mobile apps capable of detecting potentially life-threatening health issues. She is the first Allen School student to receive the award, which honors outstanding early-career researchers in wireless communications and the   Read More ...

https://www.doctoroz.com/episode/oz-investigates-could-eating-more-salt-actually-save-your-life?video_id=5797590614001 Fitness trainer Gunnar Peterson and Dr. Oz explain how the SleepScore app can help you get more rest. This technology is based on the ApneaApp technology licensed from our lab.

The UW team behind ApneaApp, left to right: Nate Watson, Rajalakshmi Nandakumar, and Shyam Gollakota. Photo credit: Sarah McQuate/University of Washington   More than a billion people worldwide experience problems related to sleep, which can have a significant impact on their health, productivity, and overall quality of life. In the   Read More ...

Check out the ICRA paper: https://homes.cs.washington.edu/~gshyam/Papers/wirelessfly.pdf

Check out the paper:   https://homes.cs.washington.edu/~gshyam/Papers/videobackscatter.pdf Check out the article by Techcrunch: https://techcrunch.com/2018/04/19/technique-to-beam-hd-video-with-99-percent-less-power-could-sharpen-the-eyes-of-smart-homes/